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Student Regalia

All regalia (gown, cap, tassel, and where appropriate, hood) must be ordered online. You must place your order between February 13, 2017, and April 3, 2017. All orders must be completed by Monday, April 3, 2017. Please log on to buildagrad.com/fisher to place your order, and e-mail Craig Keller with any questions at ckeller@fisher.edu.
 
Graduates will have the opportunity to have regalia mailed directly to their preferred mailing address.
 
On-Campus residents may choose to have their regalia sent to the college for pickup in the Student Center (133 Beacon Street, basement level). Regalia may be picked up May 2-4, 2017 between 1:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
 
You will receive an email once your regalia registration is complete.
• The e-mail will be from Build a Grad. This email order confirmation contains all the necessary details regarding your regalia order. Your order number will be on this confirmation.
• Please print this form or bring it on your mobile device if you are having your regalia shipped to Fisher College when picking up your regalia.

Graduates will have the option to have regalia delivered directly to their preferred mailing address or to Fisher College for pick-up.

Residential day school students should have regalia sent directly to the College. Pick-up will be available May 2-4, 2017, from 1:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. in the Student Center (133 Beacon Street, lower level).

DAPS students who wish to pick-up their regalia at their respective campuses should contact their Campus Coordinator for pick-up times.

Honor cords, tassels and stoles will be distributed on the morning of commencement.
 
A Brief History of Regalia

The dress worn by faculty and graduates during Commencement ceremonies is based upon costumes used in fourteenth and fifteenth century universities, particularly Oxford and Cambridge in England. This style of academic dress and accouterments has been used in the United States from colonial times, and it was standardized by an Intercollegiate Code in 1895. Like the military of medieval times with its pages, squires, and knights, the academic world has long recognized three basic levels of dignity and achievement; these are: associate, bachelors and masters.

The variety of styles and colors seen in a faculty procession reflects the fact that each college and university retains its own distinguishing customs as especially revealed by the design of its doctoral robes. When a university is granted the right to confer doctoral degrees, one of the privileges that accompany that right is the opportunity to design unique and distinctive regalia for its graduates.
 
Compiled by: Dr. Stephen E. Lunce, C.C.P.,
Associate Professor of Information Systems at Texas A&M.
  
 

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